PEPPER PRIMER

Habanero
Habanero

Not for the faint of heart, a Habanero is a hundred times as hot as an average Jalapeño. But even with all that heat, there's an underlying botanical profile that makes the Habanero particularly valuable in rubs, sauces and, of course, salsa. We vote for using it in your chili, or when you want that complex heat to underscore a well-developed sauce.

Banana
Banana

Here's the pepper you're likely to find on a pizza or pickled on your italian sub. The Banana is not terribly hot, but as with all chilies, the older, more wrinkled and stressed it might be, the more the heat can crank up. Their thin skin makes them particularly good for pickling.

Anaheim
Anaheim

Another mild chili, Anaheim peppers are bright and refreshing with just a scant hint of heat. Their flavor develops a sweetness when roasted that supports the spice to a fare-thee-well. We think they'd be especially smart skewered with swordfish, ready for a nice, hot grill.

Serrano
Serrano

More dependably hot, a Serrano carries about three to five times the heat of a Jalapeño. And like all chili peppers, it gets hotter as it ages to red. They're wonderful blistered and smoked. And a whole lot of folks apparently like nibbling them raw. Maybe you're one of them?